Description

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction is most commonly talked about as it relates to the inability to hold urine in your bladder. A laugh, a sneeze, a cough, jumping up and down and certain other activities cause leaks. That’s not what I have. I have just the opposite. The problem I have is an inability to empty your bladder. It’s extremely aggravating. There are a few other problems that come with it. Orgasm is nearly impossible and is painful when it happens. Chronic constipation, a pain in the ass, and a hip-joint that will occasionally lock up and plant me face first in the dirt. The most frequent question I am asked is how did you come to suffer from this condition?  The answer is slightly complex and somewhat simple at the same time. How is that possible? It involves a serious of colossal mishaps (I use that word lightly simply because there are no accurate words to describe the devastation and unintentional mistakes) involving my reproductive organs and their failures.

 

Not A Routine Hysterctomy

For those of you who don’t know, surgery for a hysterectomy isn’t a very long procedure. They took my back at 7:30 a.m. and told my husband and family I should be in recovery around 9:00 a.m. I remember waking up from anesthesia to see my doctor standing in front of me. That was unusual. Any other surgeries I had, it was usually a nurse in my face. It just so happened my bed was in perfect alignment to the clock on the wall behind my gynecologist. It read 4:30 p.m. He was still in bloody scrubs. He wanted to make sure I was alert before informing my family they would be moving me into recovery and keeping me overnight.

Conclusion

I know countless numbers of women who have had such easy births, a place inside of me where the bitch lives sort of hates them.  I have a good friend who had her baby in under two hours with a slight back ache.  Our first children were born a few weeks apart of each other.  She had hers first and to this day, I’m still mad that she lied to me.  I am also extremly envious of them.  To be able to tell your children the joy of their birth is something I can’t give them.  It was agony.  I reminded them frequently when they were younger to guilt them into doing their chores.  I remind them to this day.  Usually around my birthday or Christmas.  Emotional blackmail has it’s uses, but my children know they are loved so this is more of a joke.  Don’t be hating on me.

So how was your delivery?  Good? Bad? Easy? Hard? Questions? Share your story with me through the comments on this blog.  I would love to hear them.  Even if it makes the green little monster of envy stand up and take notice.

Thanks for reading, and as always, please sign up as a subscriber so my other followers aren’t as lonely. Follow me on Twitter. I’m usually up to no good there. A special shout out to @RandomRedRose for taking time out of her busy schedule to provide some much-needed positive motivation and encouragement.

Until Next Time,

Broken, After Dark

Brief History

had my first miscarriage at eighteen years old. I had my second miscarriage at twenty years old. I lost both in the middle of my second trimester. I wasn’t able to carry a child to full term until I was twenty-three years old. I also had 6 more miscarriages in the first trimester. The last one happened before I even knew I was pregnant. I had to have excess tissue removed 3 times. Each of those events left their internal mark in the form of scar tissue.

 

 

Author URL: https://www.flickr.com/people/photosavvy/ pregnant woman

When A Plan Doesn’t

Come Together

Something didn’t go according to plan. The intern who closed the incisions from my C Section wasn’t very good with his hands or his needle and thread. He actually sewed my bladder to my uterus. So when Dr. Todd went to remove the uterus, it wouldn’t come out. My bladder and my uterus were basically welded together. This is not atypical adhesions from a Caesarian Section. This is bad mojo. A urologist had to come in and remove my bladder from my body including all of the tubing that connects kidneys and the urethra (I’m so not into technical terms today, but I’m sure you get the drift). Very painstakingly both surgeons worked to remove the uterus from my bladder without actually puncturing my bladder. Once the uterus was removed and there were no holes in my bladder, they put it back in. I can’t imagine what they would have done if there had been holes. That would be a different kind of leak.

Long Term Consequences

So I have scar tissue upon scar tissue. What does this mean for me personally? I have no voluntary relaxation of the Iliococcygeus, Pubococcygeus, Puborectalis, Coccygeus, Gluteus Medius, Perineum, or the Levator ani. Basically the entire pelvic floor. I’m wound up tighter than camel’s ass in a sandstorm. Conservative treatment isn’t working for me. My team of specialists have to come up with a new plan. This will mean more invasive testing and procedures. The problem with removing scar tissue is that it simply begets more scar tissue. We’ll see.

A Small Apology

I got  new MacBook Air this week.  I’m still learning my way around it.  I was doing everything from my iPad and it just wasn’t working for me.  I’m also learning this drag and drop theme.  I’m hoping the next post turns out just a little bit better as far as continuity and appearance.  Thanks for your understanding while I go through this transition.

The Babies Are Born

My first full term pregnancy was fairly easy besides a broken rib from falling against the bathtub while I was trying to scrub it. I was a basket case wondering if this pregnancy would fail as well but I had a health baby girl. My delivery can only be described as a nightmare of epic proportions. From the time my water broke until my daughter was delivered was measured in days, not hours. I arrived at the hospital at 12:30 a.m. on a Wednesday morning and delivered vaginal at almost 6:00 p.m. Friday night. I spent over forty-eight hours on a Pitocin drip. The medical term is failure to progress. I wanted to forego having an episiotomy but I was simply too exhausted to push her out on my own. This added more scar tissue in different places.

My second full term pregnancy was delivered by emergency C-Section. The baby came early. Ass first. By the time I realized I was in labor, it was too late to turn him into the correct position. There was no alternative. At the time, I lived in a big city which had a large teaching hospital. An intern was allowed to assist. He was also allowed to stitch my incision closed. It wasn’t until 5 years later, when I needed to have a hysterectomy, it became very clear something went seriously wrong somewhere.

Author URL: https://www.flickr.com/people/bibbit/ newborn

 

 

Something didn’t go according to plan. The intern who closed the incisions from my C Section wasn’t very good with his hands or his needle and thread. He actually sewed my bladder to my uterus. So when Dr. Todd went to remove the uterus, it wouldn’t come out. My bladder and my uterus were basically welded together. This is not atypical adhesions from a Caesarian Section. This is bad mojo. A urologist had to come in and remove my bladder from my body including all of the tubing that connects kidneys and the urethra (I’m so not into technical terms today, but I’m sure you get the drift). Very painstakingly both surgeons worked to remove the uterus from my bladder without actually puncturing my bladder. Once the uterus was removed and there were no holes in my bladder, they put it back in. I can’t imagine what they would have done if there had been holes. That would be a different kind of leak.

 

A Word of Caution

After suffering from this condition, educating myself and trying to educate others, I want to dole out a little bit of unsolicted advice.  Get your pelvic wall examined.  Think of it as trip to the dentis to make sure you don’t have any cavities. As more awareness and education becomes available tomedical care providers, it is being recommended that all women have their pevlic floor examined after any trauma.  I’ve shared my trauma with you.  I’m sure there are other life events that happen to cause this.  This is done through physiatrist and not an obstetrician or gynocolgist.

 

 

UA-86477372-1